How to download and install MacOS High Sierra

Today is the day when Apple releases its newest operating system, MacOS High Sierra.  With over 200 new features and enhancements, this upgrade will be worth the wait. While obvious for most, some newer Mac users may not know how to download, install, and upgrade their computers. If you want to see what’s new, just go to the MacOS High Sierra official web page at https://www.apple.com/macos/high-sierra/ Just follow the below step by step, and you’ll be running MacOS High Sierra in no time. Login to the administrator’s account on your Mac as normal. You have to login to the Mac App Click Here to Read more

Microsoft telling Office users NOT to upgrade to MacOS High Sierra

“Microsoft has warned users of Office for Mac 2011 not to upgrade to Apple’s macOS High Sierra when the new operating system launches next month,” Gregg Keizer reports for Computerworld. “‘Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook and Lync have not been tested on macOS 10.13 High Sierra, and no formal support for this configuration will be provided,’ Microsoft wrote in a support document.” “In the same document, Microsoft told those running the newer Office 2016 for Mac that they must update its applications to version 15.35 or later, if they intend to upgrade their Macs to High Sierra,” Keizer reports. “(Version 15.35 Click Here to Read more

MacOS High Sierra: Developer vs. Public Beta

To Apple: This information contains the differences between the DEVELOPER and PUBLIC beta of the said operating system. It does not contain any list of upcoming features or any non-public information. Yes, I said that I would not be writing anything that has to do with the newest version of MacOS until September.  But this needs to be said to clear up any confusions between the Public and Developer versions of the current beta of MacOS High Sierra. Both versions are almost the same except: Developer: This contains more technical information about the inner-workings of the operating system so he or she can make sure that Click Here to Read more

Get the MacOS High Sierra Wallpaper NOW

During the WWDC Keynote of MacOS High Sierra, the desktop had a beautiful picture of a place called North Lake, just west of Bishop, California which is also a popular picture scene for professional and amateur photographers.  Now you can get the above photo without having to wait for the release of High Sierra this Fall. There are two locations where you can get the photo. Here’s how: Click here to go to a web site where the photo is located.   Click on the photo to make it the size of the screen. Right-click (CTRL-Click) on the photo. A drop-down menu Click Here to Read more

How to clear the screen when using Terminal for Mac or Linux

Sometimes, your screen can get cluttered when you’re working in the Terminal for Linux or Mac.  Fortunately, there is a very simple command to clear the screen. When you’re at the Terminal prompt, just type the command clear.  That’ll clear the screen and give you a clean slate.

Official specs for Macs upgrading to Mac OS High Sierra

On Tuesday, we reported on the specs on hardware to run the upcoming iOS 11. Now here are the official specs to run MacOS High Sierra on Mac: • iMac: Late 2009 or newer • MacBook and MacBook Retina: Late 2009 or newer • MacBook Pro: Mid 2010 or newer • MacBook Air: Late 2010 or newer • Mac Mini: Mid 2010 or newer • Mac Pro: Mid 2010 or newer

How to use Boot Camp to install Windows 10

Yes, I know it is a major sin to install Windows 10 on a Mac.  But sometimes, one cannot help but too because of school, work, or some other reason. Fortunately, Macs have a way to make this process as painless as possible, without turning the entire Mac in to a Windows system.  It’s called Boot Camp. Boot Camp comes with all Macs and allows a user to make room (called a partition) for Windows to install and run just like it was on a PC. In order for this to work, a user must have access to a full version of Click Here to Read more

How to Force Quit a running App on Mac

For the most part, the Mac is a very stable computer system. But sometimes, an app does lock up and you cannot quit it normally by using [COMMAND]+[Q] key combinations. Fortunately, Apple has made it easy to quit an offending application. Here’s how: Click  > Force Quit.  A window will open showing all of the currently running programs. Click on the app that’s locked. Click the Force Quit button on the lower-right of the window. That’s it.

New Mac Malware bypasses Gatekeeper and is non-detectible by most AntiVirus Apps

“We learned recently that macOS malware grew by 744% last year, though most of it fell into the less-worrying category of adware,” ben Lovejoy reports for 9to5Mac. “However, a newly-discovered piece of malware (via Reddit) falls into the ‘seriously nasty’ category – able to spy on all your Internet usage, including use of secure websites.” “Security researchers at CheckPoint found something they’ve labelled OSX/Dok, which manages to go undetected by Gatekeeper and stops users doing anything on their Mac until they accept a fake OS X update,” Lovejoy reports. “OSX/Dok does rely on a phishing attack as its initial way Click Here to Read more

How to enable Night Shift Mode on a Mac

Night Shift was introduced on iOS as a way to ‘soften the display’ when looking at a screen at night. By doing so, experts claim that this reduces eye strain when looking at a monitor for long periods of time. Now Night Shift has been added to Mac OS Sierra 10.12.4.  Here’s how to enable it: Select  > System Preferences.  Click Displays.  Click the Night Shift tab.  You can schedule the feature to go on at certain times, enable it manually, or have it enabled for 24 hours. The user can also adjust the brightness of the feature as well. Click Here to Read more

Apple not allowing some apps to install due to expired Developer’s Certificates

(MacRumors.com): A number of Mac apps failed to launch for users over the weekend because of a change to the way Apple certifies apps that have not been bought directly from the Mac App Store. Several users of apps including Soulver and PDFPen who had downloaded the apps from the developers’ websites all reported immediate crashes on launch. Developers of the apps quickly apologized and said that the issue was down to the apps’ code signing certificates reaching their expiration date. Apple issues developer signing certificates to assure users that an app they have downloaded outside of the Mac App Store is legitimate, comes Click Here to Read more

How to: Quickly close unused Tabs in Safari on Mac

If you surf the web like I do, you probably open different Safari tabs for different web sites.  Before you know it, you have 2o or more open tabs.  Now you don’t want to go to each tab to close it. Fortunately, Apple has provided a way to close all of the Tabs except the one you want to keep open. Here’s how: Put the Mouse on the Tab that you want to keep open. Right Click (ctrl+click) on that Tab.   Select the close other tabs option.  The other tabs will close.   

How to Reset the Mac Dock to Factory Settings

For some of us, the Dock helps us get our work done faster by providing shortcuts to the most frequently used programs.  But what if, for some reason, you want to reset the Dock to its original settings and look when you first booted your Mac.  With macOS Sierra and the Terminal, that is now possible. Here’s how: Open a Terminal window (Finder > Application > Utilities > Terminal). Type: defaults delete com.apple.dock; killall Dock Close the Terminal window. That’s it.  

Download and Install MacOS 10.12.2 for Enhanced Security – NOW.

“While some MacBook Pro owners claim macOS 10.12.2 improves battery life, there’s a more important reason to update to the latest version of Apple’s computer operating system: protecting your passwords,” Henry T. Casey reports for Laptop Magazine. “That’s because a Swedish hacker made a device that steals passwords off a Mac just by connecting a cable — unless the latest update is installed.” “Swedish hacker Ulf Frisk demonstrated his trick in a blog post yesterday (Dec. 15). By simply connecting a device running his PCILeech software to a MacBook Air’s Thunderbolt port, then forcing a reboot, you can gain the Click Here to Read more

Add Spacers to the Dock in MacOS Sierra

If you use the Mac Dock like I do, chances are the icons are crammed together because you have so many of them. Wouldn’t it be nice to have a spacer ‘|’ in between them?  Well, with the below Terminal command, you can. Here’s what to do: Launch Terminal (Finder > Applications > Utilities > Terminal) Type: defaults write com.apple.dock persistent-apps -array-add ‘{tile-data={}; tile-type=”spacer-tile”;}’ killall Dock The killall Dock command is on another line, and resets the dock so you can see the spacers in between the icons. Source: 9to5Mac.com / Lifehacker.com